Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from January, 2017

Health insurance as a contributor to high medical costs

After writing about the coming demise of the Affordable Care Act, I began to think, again, about why it costs so much to deliver healthcare in this country. If it was cheaper, legislation to make healthcare a right, rather than the randomly distributed privilege it is now, would be so much easier.

Medical costs doubled every decade from 1960 through 2000. This happened in tandem with the rise of comprehensive health insurance. Today the vast majority of health care is paid for by some sort of health insurance. Hospitals and physicians spend a huge amount of time generating information to convince insurance companies to pay us. Patients aren't usually aware that more than half of the time doctors or nurses spend at work is used to document what we do. These days it is primarily on a computer. The documentation can be helpful to communicate our thoughts and plans to colleagues or keep a record of what happened so we can create a history that caregivers can read at some future time,…

The Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) on the chopping block

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA for short, or Obamacare as it has come to be known) was passed on March 23, 2010 after intense wrangling and many compromises. It is a huge and complex bill which changed health insurance costs and availability significantly, resulting in over 20 million Americans getting health insurance who were previously uninsured. Many people can now get health care without impoverishing themselves, but the bill is also not without significant and possibly fatal flaws.

What does it do?
The link here is to a blog I wrote in early 2010 after a grueling 5 hours of reading the bill that was eventually passed. The things people like about it include:
Health insurance can be bought through "exchanges" which make it easy to compare plans and purchase insurance. The wording of policies has to be understandable for regular people. An insurance company can't refuse to cover a patient because of a pre-existing condition and insurance rates can…

Conflict of Interest in Medicine--Why should we care?

This weeks issue if the JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) reads like an expose. At least 3 of the research articles do. So exciting. I don't want medicine, my field, to be ethically unsavory, but it is sometimes. It makes me proud to see that it sometimes polices itself and that such information is published in a high profile journal.

The first article is entitled "Patient Advocacy Organizations, Industry Funding and Conflict of Interest" by Susanna Rose of the Cleveland Clinic along with colleagues of hers from the University of Chicago. It turns out that 67% of  patient advocacy organizations such as the American Diabetic Association, the Multiple Sclerosis Foundation and March of Dimes, organizations that support patients with various diseases, receive support from industry. Specifically "industry" means organizations that make money by selling products related to health. More than one in 10 of these organizations received over half of thei…

The 21st Century Cures Act--allowing drug companies to speed up development of drugs that may not work

Early in December Congress came together in bipartisan support of HR 6, the "20th Century Cures Act." So unusual, these days, for a "landmark bill" to pass into law without major objections by Democrats or Republicans. Perhaps something fishy was going on. Perhaps this was a chance to please special interests while making the average voter feel that, at last, congress was going to accomplish something good.

The bill was hailed as supporting the development of new drugs and devices to cure dread diseases by reducing unnecessary regulation by the Food and Drug Administration. I found the text. It is amazingly difficult to read. The legal terminology is nearly impenetrable and the actual content is pretty hard to discern. It is also full of barely related measures, some of them excellent and some of them likely to have nasty consequences. I am particularly wary of the provision that encourages use of digital medical imaging by paying less and less for tests done with…